Synopsis & Overview


GARBH is a critically acclaimed production of Sansaptak. The original Bengali play 'Garvoj', written and directed by Sh. Torit Mitra, was first performed in 1994. Later numerous shows were performed in Delhi and Kolkata. In 2010, Garvoj was translated to Garbh, a Hindi-Khortha play (the dialect Khortha was used after research and recce to Jharkhand) and performed in Delhi, where Sh. Torit Mitra was awarded as one of the best Directors in Delhi by Sahitya Kala Parishad and the play performed again in Bharatendu Natya Utsav in 2011. The play was published by the group in 2012 along with 3 others under the title 'Hari-Bhari Khwahish tatha Anya Natak'. In 2018, the play will be performed under Sansaptak's artistic movement 'Theatre of the Dark' under the design and direction of Sh. Anjon Bose, Sh. Torit Mitra's disciple, and will be accommodating the 4th and 5th generation actors of the group.


Synopsis

A thought or an idea is a mere abstract experience that does not have any shape or form. Just like the fetus in a mother's womb that is unaware of the cardinal directions of the world, until touched by reality.

Garbh is a play of mental process and dilemma. The play inspired by Sam Shepard's "Burried Child", written by Sh. Torit Mitra and directed by Anjon Bose, portrays a very personal crisis of a farmer, Sukhdev Puswa's family of Jharkhand. Like a mystery plot the story unfolds with the arrival of the youngest family member, Vishweshwar, with his friend, Swarnarekha, both students of anthropology in Delhi University. The curiosity to research about suburban India leads to a series of questions put up by the friend, who senses something fowl within the family's history.

A horrendous sin committed in the past has led to suffocation and a depressing darkness upon the family, eating away at the very fabric of this social institution. The mental trauma and impasse they go through creates friction, thus, revealing the socio-economic and political decadency of each member. Sukhdev becomes helpless and aggressive to his elder son, Aghan, once a Maoist rebel, gone almost insane, and his younger son, Budhuwa, has become an insolent fool, always accusing others for his miserable state. His wife, Sumri Devi, is the sole cohesive factor of the family.

The situation becomes more mysterious when an infertile land, left barren for years, becomes fertile again, causing the questions to spread like a pandemic throughout the family. In consonance with these, the historical commotions between the natives and foreigners become more extreme and more hidden truths fall tumbling out of the closet, reaching the brim of breaking all traditional values and morals. The only remaining strength is induced to fight for survival between man-made society and the laws of nature.

GARBH